See 2 months in the life of a forest in this cool time-lapse video of a controlled burn and what happens afterwards. Courtesy of Rich Reid.

Read how fire can restore a forest

rhamphotheca:

NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research
A baby deep sea octopus (Graneledone verrucosa) moves across the seafloor as the Deep Discoverer remotely operated vehicle explores Veatch Canyon.Check out other incredible critters of the deep we’ve seen during the Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition.

rhamphotheca:

A baby deep sea octopus (Graneledone verrucosa) moves across the seafloor as the Deep Discoverer remotely operated vehicle explores Veatch Canyon.

Check out other incredible critters of the deep we’ve seen during the Northeast U.S. Canyons Expedition.

What is “impact” for science, anyway? And could the ways we define impact explain why we have less of it than we think we should? Why impact factor isn’t the same as impact.

What is “impact” for science, anyway? And could the ways we define impact explain why we have less of it than we think we should? Why impact factor isn’t the same as impact.

When the world gets warmer, what happens to bison? They go on a diet. A new study finds that grazing animals like bison and cattle will have access to less protein under climate change.

"Why warm climates would shrink grazers is still being worked out, but it appears that the soils of warm-climate grasslands supply less nitrogen to grasses and the grasses produce less protein in their leaves. Most grazers in the United States are limited by protein, which is expensive to supplement … It’s estimated that every 1.5°F increase in temperature could cost ranchers in the United States $1 billion dollars in lost income due to cattle gaining less weight.”

 Read the full article.
Photo by Matt Miller/TNC.

When the world gets warmer, what happens to bison? They go on a diet. A new study finds that grazing animals like bison and cattle will have access to less protein under climate change.

"Why warm climates would shrink grazers is still being worked out, but it appears that the soils of warm-climate grasslands supply less nitrogen to grasses and the grasses produce less protein in their leaves. Most grazers in the United States are limited by protein, which is expensive to supplement … It’s estimated that every 1.5°F increase in temperature could cost ranchers in the United States $1 billion dollars in lost income due to cattle gaining less weight.”

 Read the full article.

Photo by Matt Miller/TNC.

The Silence of the Snake Researchers: 
Here’s what you quickly learn about rattlesnake researchers: They’re fearless, but pay obsessive attention to safety. They watch their step. And they keep their mouths shut.  

The Silence of the Snake Researchers:

Here’s what you quickly learn about rattlesnake researchers: They’re fearless, but pay obsessive attention to safety. They watch their step. And they keep their mouths shut.  

explore-blog:

A win for citizen science: More than a year after one of the oldest trees in the world burned down in arson, scientists resurrect it using branch clippings of the famed cypress preserved by a plant nursery owner, a science teacher, and a team of forestry researchers in an enthusiast experiment launched sixteen years ago.
(via and photograph by Rachel Sussman)

explore-blog:

A win for citizen science: More than a year after one of the oldest trees in the world burned down in arson, scientists resurrect it using branch clippings of the famed cypress preserved by a plant nursery owner, a science teacher, and a team of forestry researchers in an enthusiast experiment launched sixteen years ago.

(via and photograph by Rachel Sussman)

Snake fungal disease: could it be the white-nose syndrome for snakes? Matt Miller visits Vermont researchers who are finding it among endangered timber rattlers there. 

Snake fungal disease: could it be the white-nose syndrome for snakes? Matt Miller visits Vermont researchers who are finding it among endangered timber rattlers there

Live osprey nest cam, Orange Beach, Alabama. Here’s more on why ospreys are such a great indicator species for coastal ecosystem health.

This tree was felled by Dutch elm disease. But some elm trees are proving to be resistant to the disease, leading scientists to experiment with a  genetic “dating service” that just might help restore these majestic trees.
Read the story: Matchmaking for Elms: Restoring America’s Iconic Tree Through Genetics
Photo by Flickr user Nic McPhee via a Creative Commons license.

This tree was felled by Dutch elm disease. But some elm trees are proving to be resistant to the disease, leading scientists to experiment with a  genetic “dating service” that just might help restore these majestic trees.

Read the story: Matchmaking for Elms: Restoring America’s Iconic Tree Through Genetics

Photo by Flickr user Nic McPhee via a Creative Commons license.

What can an ecologist learn from elephant poop?

Research on elephant dung using advanced genetic testing is helping scientists understand if elephants can live alongside people and livestock without experiencing chronic stress.  

Cantor’s giant softshell turtle hatchlings, hatched through a conservation program along the Mekong River in Cambodia. Find out why freshwater scientist Jeff Opperman has “hope amid the dams and dangers" on the Mekong.

Photo by Jeff Opperman/TNC.

The best birding apps — which one should the smart birder use? Tim Boucher reviews his 5 favorites.
Photo: Golden-fronted whitestart, seen in Colombia. Tim Boucher/TNC

The best birding apps — which one should the smart birder use? Tim Boucher reviews his 5 favorites.

Photo: Golden-fronted whitestart, seen in Colombia. Tim Boucher/TNC

Return of the cicadas! The Brood II Cicadas have been underground for 17 years. This year, they’ll rise, mate and sing for several weeks in early summer. 

All photos taken in Killingworth, CT by © David Gumbart/TNC. See more here.

For World Turtle Day, a must-see video of conservationists helping hatch baby Hawksbill turtles in the Solomon Islands. 

Yes, the world is round — but it has some anomalies.
Nature Conservancy Senior Advisory on Poverty and Conservation Craig Leisher on a new study showing protected areas help stop deforestation — with some important exceptions.