Posts tagged fishing

Researchers on the Apalachicola River in Florida are tracking shad to help determine the best ways to restore their populations.
The best option: Using shipping locks to let shad pass through dams—a low-tech, low-cost method. Read the blog.
Photo: Research assistant Chase Kataechis handles an Alabama shad he just netted. Matt Miller/TNC

Researchers on the Apalachicola River in Florida are tracking shad to help determine the best ways to restore their populations.

The best option: Using shipping locks to let shad pass through dams—a low-tech, low-cost method. Read the blog.

Photo: Research assistant Chase Kataechis handles an Alabama shad he just netted. Matt Miller/TNC

Build it and they will…spawn. 
New research on northern pike will help conservationists plan stream restoration projects.
Photo: University of Wisconsin graduate student Dan Oele with northern pike near Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Build it and they will…spawn.

New research on northern pike will help conservationists plan stream restoration projects.

Photo: University of Wisconsin graduate student Dan Oele with northern pike near Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Sun rise over The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Creek Preserve, Idaho.
Credit: Giuseppe Saitta

Sun rise over The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Creek Preserve, Idaho.

Credit: Giuseppe Saitta

Local communities are protecting these spawning congregations in Manus, Papua New Guinea. But what if the juvenile fish produced in these areas just swim hundreds of miles away? The local community would receive no benefit for its protection.
Fortunately, that’s not the case. New genetic research shows that for coral groupers, local protections means local benefits. Read more.

Local communities are protecting these spawning congregations in Manus, Papua New Guinea. But what if the juvenile fish produced in these areas just swim hundreds of miles away? The local community would receive no benefit for its protection.

Fortunately, that’s not the case. New genetic research shows that for coral groupers, local protections means local benefits. Read more.

“When the field started the ocean was mostly un-explored (and large sections of the ocean still are).  The last frontier should and will continue to provide inspiration for years to come.  But what about all the people that we now know live and depend on the ocean? Who solves their mysteries and the integral part that the ocean plays in solving their riddles?”
—Vera Agostini, "The Future of Oceanography: Where are the People?"
Photo by Vera Agostini/TNC

When the field started the ocean was mostly un-explored (and large sections of the ocean still are).  The last frontier should and will continue to provide inspiration for years to come.  But what about all the people that we now know live and depend on the ocean? Who solves their mysteries and the integral part that the ocean plays in solving their riddles?”

—Vera Agostini, "The Future of Oceanography: Where are the People?"

Photo by Vera Agostini/TNC

After being extirpated from the state, alligator gar return to Illinois. And they’re growing fast!
Photo: Researcher Nathan Grider of the University of Illinois-Springfield and Ron Hilsabeck of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

After being extirpated from the state, alligator gar return to Illinois. And they’re growing fast!

Photo: Researcher Nathan Grider of the University of Illinois-Springfield and Ron Hilsabeck of the Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

Once people considered alligator gar a menace to rivers. They blamed them  for killing off gamefish. They accused them of eating people. And so they shot, poisoned and dynamited alligator gar across their range.
This great fish disappeared from many rivers, convicted of crimes it never committed.
It was declared extinct in Illinois in 1994.
But now, the alligator gar is back.

Once people considered alligator gar a menace to rivers. They blamed them  for killing off gamefish. They accused them of eating people. And so they shot, poisoned and dynamited alligator gar across their range.

This great fish disappeared from many rivers, convicted of crimes it never committed.

It was declared extinct in Illinois in 1994.

But now, the alligator gar is back.

Fish being dried to make a fish paste in a small fishing camp near Khone Falls of the Mekong River, at the Lao-Cambodia border. 
Credit: Jeff Opperman/TNC

Fish being dried to make a fish paste in a small fishing camp near Khone Falls of the Mekong River, at the Lao-Cambodia border. 

Credit: Jeff Opperman/TNC

Picture a river that has catfish the size of bears. With a giant freshwater stingray that could blanket a king-size bed and weighs as much as a buffalo.

Jeff Opperman, senior freshwater scientist for The Nature Conservancy.

Join Jeff as he blogs from a place where such “river monsters” still swim—the Mekong Delta. Traveling with his family, he’ll explore the Mekong’s uncertain future and the often-difficult issues people face.

 His adventure begins today on the New York Times Green blog.

An American eel captured at a fish restoration project in northern Florida. Credit: Steven Herrington/TNC

An American eel captured at a fish restoration project in northern Florida. Credit: Steven Herrington/TNC

The haul from electro-fishing a restored northern Florida stream. Credit: Matt Miller/TNC

The haul from electro-fishing a restored northern Florida stream. Credit: Matt Miller/TNC

Monitoring fish populations by electro-fishing—sending volts of electricity that bring fish to the surface—at The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Creek Preserve in Idaho.
Silver Creek is a popular and famoud destination for anglers; it is also one of the most studied spring creeks in the world.
Credit: Matt Miller/TNC

Monitoring fish populations by electro-fishing—sending volts of electricity that bring fish to the surface—at The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Creek Preserve in Idaho.

Silver Creek is a popular and famoud destination for anglers; it is also one of the most studied spring creeks in the world.

Credit: Matt Miller/TNC

"Trout Week" doesn’t have quite the same ring as "Shark Week," unless, that is, you’re a vole.
Stories abound of trout at The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Creek Preserve gulping down unlucky rodents. All anglers want to believe this, but the mouse-eating fish tales never quite had the ring of truth.
But scientists have found that Silver Creek’s trout do indeed feed on rodents. One electro-fishing survey—looking at fish diets—found the above trout with three freshly-killed voles in its stomach. 
Yum.
In certain years, voles explode in population — providing a feast for hawks, owls, coyotes, rattlesnakes and weasels. And trout. On one evening during a vole irruption, I walked through the preserve at night, often hearing a light splash of a vole falling into the stream followed by a much larger one—Jaws on a spring creek scale.
Brown trout are voracious predators, and a “vole hatch” is too much protein to pass up.
Just try not think of this photo the next time you sit down to a trout dinner.—Matt Miller
(Photo credit: Ralph Stewart)

"Trout Week" doesn’t have quite the same ring as "Shark Week," unless, that is, you’re a vole.

Stories abound of trout at The Nature Conservancy’s Silver Creek Preserve gulping down unlucky rodents. All anglers want to believe this, but the mouse-eating fish tales never quite had the ring of truth.

But scientists have found that Silver Creek’s trout do indeed feed on rodents. One electro-fishing survey—looking at fish diets—found the above trout with three freshly-killed voles in its stomach.

Yum.

In certain years, voles explode in population — providing a feast for hawks, owls, coyotes, rattlesnakes and weasels. And trout. On one evening during a vole irruption, I walked through the preserve at night, often hearing a light splash of a vole falling into the stream followed by a much larger one—Jaws on a spring creek scale.

Brown trout are voracious predators, and a “vole hatch” is too much protein to pass up.

Just try not think of this photo the next time you sit down to a trout dinner.—Matt Miller

(Photo credit: Ralph Stewart)

When Conservancy staff conduct aquatic biological surveys in Florida rivers, they often find fish bearing long gashes on their sides.
Those gashes are courtesy of this predator: the longnose gar. The gar’s snout contains needle-like teeth, and they often attack prey by slashing it.
Unlike most fish, gar can gulp oxygen from the air via their swim bladders (and in slow-moving rivers, you can often see their snouts pop up above the water’s surface). This enables them to survive in conditionst that would kill most fish; they can even live out of water for several hours if they’re kept moist.
(Photo: Longnose gar, Apalachicola River, Florida. Credit: Matt Miller/TNC).

When Conservancy staff conduct aquatic biological surveys in Florida rivers, they often find fish bearing long gashes on their sides.

Those gashes are courtesy of this predator: the longnose gar. The gar’s snout contains needle-like teeth, and they often attack prey by slashing it.

Unlike most fish, gar can gulp oxygen from the air via their swim bladders (and in slow-moving rivers, you can often see their snouts pop up above the water’s surface). This enables them to survive in conditionst that would kill most fish; they can even live out of water for several hours if they’re kept moist.

(Photo: Longnose gar, Apalachicola River, Florida. Credit: Matt Miller/TNC).

This photo of my great-great grandfather John Ritchie always suggested to me wilderness adventure and the rugged outdoor life.
Well, maybe.
My pike researcher friends in Wisconsin tell me he almost certainly speared that pike in a roadside ditch.
Not a remote lake, loons calling in the background. A ditch.
Today, Conservancy scientists are looking to ditches as a way to restore populations of pike and other native fish.
Wilderness? Not quite. But we can still have large, predatory fish in our midst just by changing road culverts. Read the blog.

This photo of my great-great grandfather John Ritchie always suggested to me wilderness adventure and the rugged outdoor life.

Well, maybe.

My pike researcher friends in Wisconsin tell me he almost certainly speared that pike in a roadside ditch.

Not a remote lake, loons calling in the background. A ditch.

Today, Conservancy scientists are looking to ditches as a way to restore populations of pike and other native fish.

Wilderness? Not quite. But we can still have large, predatory fish in our midst just by changing road culverts. Read the blog.